#AruWSIG19 Yesterday’s Recap

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Good Morning Arusha?

Here’s a recap of yesterday as we look at what the last day looks like.

Key takeaways from yesterday’s sessions of #AruWSIG19  were:

  1. Research and Data Driven Advocacy. This session was facilitated by Mr. Alban Manishimwe-NMAIST, Uganda Bureau of Statistics.

What is Data Driven Advocacy?

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Data can paint a clearer picture of a situation. When visualized and published on a website, data can help create powerful imagery to convey information, strengthen arguments and bridge gaps among stakeholders with different levels of familiarity with an area of advocacy.

  1. Introduction to Digital, Media and Social Mobilization tools for campaigns.

The explosion of social media in the recent times, has drastically transformed the way information is created, disseminated and distributed.

  1. ICTs and Mental Health. This session was facilitated by Hazel Muriro from Mindful Conversations. The overall outcome of this session was to explore possible associations between information and communication technology (ICT) use and mental health symptoms among young adults. By “ICT” in this context is meant mainly computer and mobile phone use. The question of: What is it about new technology that is making many of us anxious and stressed? It was clear that we literally have the internet in our pocket at all times and can seemingly find out the answer to almost any question at the touch of a button.  But while these advancements in technological functionality and access are amazing; they come at a cost. There is also evidence that we are becoming over dependent, or even possibly addicted, to our phones. Think about how you feel when you realize you have forgotten your phone, or left it behind somewhere.

Welcome to the last day and stay tuned to live updates across our social media platforms.

Have a Lovely day!

#AruWSIG19: Day one Recap

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Here’s a quick recap of what happened on Day One of AruWSIG19, as well as a look ahead at what to expect today.

Officially, the workshop started at 9 am and there was plenty of activities during the mid-morning.

During the day, workshop attendees began arriving at the Obuntu Hub, eager for the workshop to begin.

Among the sessions yesterday was Introduction to Internet Governance, Infrastructure and Institutions.

Takeaways from that session were;

Internet Governance is the development and application of shared principles, norms rules, decision-making procedures, and programs that shape the evolution and the use of the internet. A key outcome from that session was that, although internet governance deals with the core of the digital world, governance cannot be handles with the digital-binary logic of the true or false, or good or bad.

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There was a session that challenged participants on how often we use our smartphones to speak about Human Rights Violations by using our social media handles especially Twitter?

It has been noted that recently, there is a rise in documenting Human Rights Violation by using smartphones. The transition from Press Releases and Speeches (Participation Online) have proved that the youth are engaging online with their leaders where they directly challenge their leaders and hold them accountable. The mobilization of youth and people online is becoming quite common and it has also prone people to fake news from the government leaders who don’t agree with what the citizens who hold them accountable.

Another amazing session was facilitated by George Owuor from Facebook, who took participants through Content Moderation on Social Media.

Content Moderation is the practice of monitoring and applying a pre-determined set of rules and guidelines to user-generated submissions to determine best if communication is permissible or not.

Content moderators protect Facebook’s 2.3 billion members. Who protects them? The moderators protect Facebook’s users from exposure to humanity’s darkest impulses. Constant exposure to violence, hatred and sordid acts can wreak havoc on a person’s mental health.

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The session that followed was on Feminist Principles of the Internet which was facilitated by Rebecca Ryakitimbo. During this session, participants were split into groups and they took time to discuss what they understand by: The Feminist Principles of the Internet are a series of statements that offer a gender and sexual rights lens on critical internet-related rights. They were drafted at the first Imagine a Feminist Internet meeting that took place in Malaysia in April 2014. The meeting was organised by the Association for Progressive Communications (APC) and brought together 50 activists and advocates working in sexual rights, women’s rights, violence against women, and internet rights. The meeting was designed as an adapted open space where topics were identified, prioritized, and discussed collectively.

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On Tap For Today:

#AruWSIG19 gets better today with presentations discussing:

  1. Research and Data Driven Advocacy.
  2. Introduction to Digital , Media and Social Mobilization tools for digital rights campaigns.
  3. Mindful Conversations, ICT and Mental Health among others.

Stay Tuned for more updates throughout the workshop.

 

Enjoy!

STEAM Education-Way of the Future

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STEM is a curriculum based on the idea of educating students in four specific disciplines — science, technology, engineering and mathematics — in an interdisciplinary and applied approach.

KsGEN is putting in effort is to meet the need of educating local communities in STEM areas. We have introduced STEAM education as well, which adds the Arts. What separates STEAM from the traditional science and math education is the blended learning environment and showing students how the scientific and artistic methods can be applied to everyday life. It teaches students computational thinking and focuses on the real world applications of problem solving.

Much of the STEAM curriculum will be aimed toward attracting underrepresented populations. Female students, for example, are significantly less likely to pursue a college major or career. Though this is nothing new, the gap is increasing at a significant rate. Male students are also more likely to pursue engineering and technology fields, while female students prefer science fields, like biology, chemistry, and marine biology. Overall, male students are three times more likely to be interested in pursuing a STEM career.

An education that culminates in a solid foundation of science, technology, engineering, and math is never a bad thing. The danger is when we focus on these fields to the detriment of other fields, such as language arts, history, visual arts, music, and social studies. There’s more danger in assuming that because college students major in STEM subjects, they will find well-paying jobs upon graduation.

By Wanjiku Kang’ethe